.........Home | bio | Longer | What is Esquire's Cocktail of the Week? | contact: joseph.mailander@gmail.com ........... ... ...

Saturday, May 28, 2011

Memorial Day mojito

As to why more people don't make mojitos on Memorial Day weekend, I have no idea. My father's WWII ships often hit the strategic English port in Bermuda on their way out, mare's tails wispy overhead. Rummies all, they had plenty of mint too, as that was the only thing that grew well on board. Where you find Englishmen you can find club soda, called soda water through the UK, so Bermuda was a good place to have a mojito, long before that notorious sissy Ernest Hemingway discovered them in Cuba in the '50's.

My own key to mojito manufacture is to muddle the lime wedges along with the sugar. This makes the drink a little more muddy, and lime pulp is good--otherwise, I find the presentation far too tame. As usual, we turn to the canonical Cocktail DB for the best recipe:

4 wedges lime (2 oz, 6 cl, 1/2 gills)
2 to 3 teaspoons granulated sugar (1 cl, 1/16 gills)
8 to 10 fresh mint leaves (4 oz, 12 cl, 1 gills)
2 ounces light rum (6 cl, 1/2 gills)
club soda
2 or 3 mint sprigs, for garnish (1 oz, 3 cl, 1/4 gills)

Muddle the lime wedges, sugar, and mint leaves in a mixing glass until the sugar is completely dissolved, all the juice is extracted from the limes, and the mint is thoroughly integrated into the juice. Add ice, and the rum, to the mixing glass, shake briefly, and strain into a collins glass filled with crushed ice. Top with club soda, and add the garnish.
Yes. The resulting drink is very easy to slam--a poet's drink, really, and that's why that notorious sissy Ernest Hemingway favored it. He preferred drinks that could be swilled by the gallon. His devoted yuppie tribalist heirs at Esquire think they are doing something exciting when having two. But really, the honestly macho Canadians of WWII, once in Bermuda, drank mojitos and also dark & stormies, which are about four parts dark rum and one part ginger beer, largely because you get more alcohol in a dark & stormy than in a mojito--unless the mojito is the size of an AM/PM supertanker. Which it should not be, because mojitos like almost all cocktails should be served very cold and drank very cold. A mojito is a polite company drink. As such, it is good for honoring the fallen, whose cause is certainly expressive of wanting the living to live.

No comments: